The Itch of Literature
Blaire Lauren. Creative Writing Major. Lover of Literature. I have been bitten by the writers' bug, and here is where I shall scratch.
For Official Things
& such

Don’t let the bastards grind you down.

Margaret Atwood, The Handmaid’s Tale (via hqlines)

macrolit:

The Brothers Karamazov, Fyodor Dostoevsky

jgqcmp:

Perfection

jgqcmp:

Perfection

It’s dark because you are trying too hard. Lightly child, lightly. Learn to do everything lightly. Yes, feel lightly even though you’re feeling deeply. Just lightly let things happen and lightly cope with them. I was so preposterously serious in those days…Lightly, lightly—it’s the best advice ever given me. So throw away your baggage and go forward. There are quicksands all about you, sucking at your feet, trying to suck you down into fear and self-pity and despair. That’s why you must walk so lightly. Lightly, my darling.

Aldous Huxley (via wordsthat-speak)

the-art-of-fangirling:

The Lizzie Bennet Diaries + text posts

Kurt Vonnegut’s Rules for Short Stories
1. Use the time of a total stranger in such a way that he or she will not feel the time was wasted.

2. Give the reader at least one character he or she can root for.

3. Every character should want something, even if it is only a glass of water.

4. Every sentence must do one of two things–reveal character or advance the action.

5. Start as close to the end as possible.

6. Be a sadist. No matter how sweet and innocent your leading characters, make awful things happen to them–in order that the reader may see what they are made of.

7. Write to please just one person. If you open a window and make love to the world, so to speak, your story will get pneumonia.

8. Give your readers as much information as possible as soon as possible. To heck with suspense. Readers should have such complete understanding of what is going on, where and why, that they could finish the story themselves, should cockroaches eat the last few pages.

Kurt Vonnegut (via chrisarrant)

bittenbybooksblog:

I just finished Oryx and Crake by Margaret Atwood and it was really intriguing and very thoughtful. The ending totally made me want to start The Year of the Flood right away!

bittenbybooksblog:

I just finished Oryx and Crake by Margaret Atwood and it was really intriguing and very thoughtful. The ending totally made me want to start The Year of the Flood right away!

You think I’m not a  g o d d e s s ?

(Source: arryns)

tags → #mythology #asoiaf 
tags → #jrr tolkien